Mark Zuckerberg and Jack Dorsey face Senate grilling over tech platforms – as it happened

Chief executives of Facebook and Twitter quizzed by judiciary committee on allegations of anti-conservative bias and handling of election

Full story: CEOs testify on alleged anti-conservative bias

8.01pm GMT

That’s all, folks! Today’s hearing was called to address the way an article from the New York Post was handled on Facebook and Twitter.

That was discussed, but so were other issues including how these platforms handled and will continue to handle election misinformation and whether the law shielding them from legal liability for content posted, called section 230, should be modified or repealed.

7.58pm GMT

And, we end the hearing with a lengthy diatribe from Senator Marsha Blackburn of Tennessee. She is angry Facebook takes advertising money from Chinese companies like Huawei and Alibaba.

Senator Blackburn wants to speak to the manager on why her posts get flagged pic.twitter.com/TVMfVlrEsY

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