UK video game industry thrives amid lockdowns and US bidding wars

Sector grows as developers continue to work and consumers search for Covid boredom relief

The lockdown boom in video games has put the spotlight on the global success of British game makers, attracting the attention of deep-pocketed US giants looking to snap up valuable pandemic-proof businesses.

Electronic Arts, the California-based global gaming giant, announced a surprise £945m bid for Codemasters, the maker of Formula One racing games.

Continue reading…

Visit the Source

Return to this Topic

Related Articles

Bill Gates joins Blackstone in bid to buy British private jet firm

Gates’ Cascade Investment fund teams up with US private equity firm on offer for Signature AviationBill Gates has joined a £3bn bidding war to buy the world’s largest private jet operator just as he prepares to publish his new book How to Avoid a Climate Disaster.Cascade Investment, the fund that manages much of Gates’s $134bn personal fortune, announced on Friday it had teamed up with US private equity firm Blackstone in a bid for British private jet operator Signature Aviation. Continue reading…

The Force re-awakens: Ubisoft working on new open-world Star Wars game

Although details are sparse, fans are hopeful the game being developed by Massive is just the epic narrative adventure they are looking forUbisoft is working on a new open-world Star Wars adventure, the company has revealed. Development will be handled by the French publisher’s Massive studio, previously responsible for the online shooter series, Tom Clancy’s The Division.According to a report by Wired, production of the game is still in the early stages and nothing has been revealed about the characters or setting, or how the game will fit into the Star Wars cinematic universe. The project is being built using Massive’s proprietary Snowdrop game engine, under The Division’s creative director, Julian Gerighty, who also worked on the Prince of Persia and Far Cry franchises. Continue reading…

All I want for 2021 is to see Mark Zuckerberg up in court | John Naughton

The tech giants’ law-free bonanza is coming to an end on both sides of the Atlantic, but let’s speed up the process It’s always risky making predictions about the tech industry, but this year looks like being different, at least in the sense that there are two safe bets. One is that the attempts to regulate the tech giants that began last year will intensify; the second that we will be increasingly deluged by sanctimonious cant from Facebook & co as they seek to avoid democratic curbing of their unaccountable power.On the regulation front, last year in the US, Alphabet, Google’s corporate owner, found itself facing major antitrust suits from 38 states as well as from the Department of Justice. On this side of the pond, there are preparations for a Digital Markets Unit with statutory powers that will be able to neatly sidestep the tricky definitional questions of what constitutes a monopoly in a digital age. Instead, the unit will decide on a case-by-case basis whether a particular tech company has “strategic market status” if it possesses “substantial, entrenched market power in at least one digital activity” or if it acts as an online “gateway” for other businesses. And if a company is judged to have this status, then penalties and regulations will be imposed on it. Continue reading…

Games prove Christmas hit as UK spends holiday in lockdown

About 25 million logged on to the PC gaming platform Steam on the biggest ever Christmas Day for the video games industryThis Christmas has been the biggest ever for the video games industry, as lockdown, technological leaps and new consoles combine to bring more interest than ever to the sector.Steam, the PC gaming platform, recorded its largest ever Christmas Day, according to public stats, with almost 25 million people logged on to the service at 3.10pm UK time, more than 6 million of whom were actively playing a game concurrently. That was up from the 15 million who logged on to the service at once on Christmas Day 2019. Continue reading…

Video games have replaced music as the most important aspect of youth culture | Sean Monahan

The global video gaming industry took in an estimated $180bn in 2020 – more than sports and movies worldwideIt would be incorrect to say video games went mainstream in 2020. They’ve been mainstream for decades. But their place in pop culture feels far more central – to gamers and non-gamers alike – than ever before. In part, this is due to desperate marketers hunting for eyeballs in a Covid landscape of cancelled events. Coachella wasn’t happening, but Animal Crossing was open was for business. Politicians eager to “Rock the Vote” looked to video games to reach young voters. (See: Joe and Kamala’s virtual HQ and AOC streaming herself playing Among Us.) The time-honored tradition of older politicians trying to seem young and hip at a music venue has been replaced by older politicians trying to seem young and hip playing a video game. Yes, quarantine was part of this. But, like so many trends during the pandemic, Covid didn’t spark this particular trajectory so much as intensify it. Long before the lockdowns, video games had triumphed as the most popular form of entertainment among young people. Related: Refreshingly modern dinosaurs and a cyberpunk cat: our games picks for 2021 Continue reading…