'He's a risk-taker': Germans divided over Elon Musk's new GigaFactory

The Tesla project will put Grünheide on the map, but some say it is doing ‘irreversible’ harm to the environment

For the past 10 months, Silas Heineken has been flying a drone over one of Germany’s biggest building sites and posting the images on YouTube.

The 14-year-old self-named “Tesla Kid” has built a significant following, as tens of thousands tune in each week to see the latest developments in Elon Musk’s GigaFactory as it emerges at speed from the sandy ground of Brandenburg, south-east of Berlin.

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Elon Musk: from bullied schoolboy to world's richest man

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Facebook admits encryption will harm efforts to prevent child exploitation

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I warned in 2018 YouTube was fueling far-right extremism. Here's what the platform should be doing

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