One third of Australian users have not updated Covidsafe app

New data reveals that more than two million users are using an outdated version of the contact tracing app

State by state restrictions explained
Covid hotspots Victoria; NSW hotspots; Queensland hotspots

Nearly one third of the seven million Australians who downloaded the Covidsafe app have not updated to the most recent version, as new figures show the government spend on the contact tracing app has risen to $14m.

The Covidsafe contact tracing app relies on as many people as possible running it, but new data reveals that more than two million users do not have the most up-to-date version.

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