Facebook asks to appeal court ruling that it conducts business in Australia

Social media company aims to avoid liability over Cambridge Analytica scandal by arguing it does not collect or hold data in Australia

Facebook is claiming it does not conduct business in Australia and does not collect and hold data in the country in its effort to avoid liability over the Cambridge Analytica scandal.

Last year, the privacy commissioner took Facebook to court over an alleged mass privacy breach involving the use of Australians’ Facebook data in a vote-influencing operation involving Cambridge Analytica, a company that assisted the Trump campaign and was then headed by Trump’s key adviser Steve Bannon.

Continue reading…

Visit the Source

Return to this Topic

Related Articles

Facebook bans users and publishers from sharing news in Australia – video

Facebook has made good on its threat to ban Australians from seeing or posting news content on its site in response to the federal government’s proposed news media code. As of Thursday morning, news publishers were unable to post content on pages, while articles were also blocked from being shared. In implementing its new ban, the social media giant also blocked a number of government departments, charities and its own page. Treasurer Josh Frydenberg lambasted the company, saying the social media giant’s ‘actions were unnecessary, they were heavy-handed, and they will damage its reputation here in Australia’Facebook blocks Australian users and publishers from viewing or sharing newsFacebook’s botched Australia news ban hits health departments, charities and its own pagesAustralia politics live: ‘Facebook was wrong’ to block pages in news ban, Josh Frydenberg says – question time Continue reading…

'Time to reactivate MySpace': the day Australia woke up to a Facebook news blackout

Facebook users flocked to Twitter to complain about the ban, which also struck community pages, health departments, charities and politicians• Facebook blocks Australian users and publishers from viewing or sharing news • Blocking Australian news shows Facebook’s pledge to fight misinformation is farcicalAt 5.30am Australian east coast time, after months of threats and failed attempts to lobby the government over proposed new media laws, Facebook banned the sharing of news in Australia.The first to notice were morning news producers. The main page of the national broadcaster, ABC, was down. Guardian Australia’s page was also down. Australians trying to post links to news publishers on their personal Facebook pages received an error message. Continue reading…

Tory party illegally collected data on ethnicity of 10m voters, MPs told

Information commissioner says data was voluntarily deleted amid concerns about ‘weak’ enforcementThe Conservative party acted illegally when it collected data on the ethnic backgrounds of 10 million voters ahead of the 2019 general election, the information commissioner has told a committee of MPs.However, Elizabeth Denham insisted there had been no need to issue an enforcement notice against the party, as it had voluntary deleted the data it held after a “recommendation” from her office.Answering questions at a Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport select committee meeting on Tuesday morning, Denham said that the Conservatives’ collection of estimated data on voters’ ethnic origin, religion, and country of birth had no legal basis.“We made the recommendation that they destroy the data because they didn’t have a legal basis to collect it,” she said, adding, under sustained questioning from the SNP MP John Nicolson: “It was illegal to collect the ethnicity data.”The breach was first highlighted in November in a report by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO), assessing political parties’ compliance with data protection laws. It reported that the Conservatives had purchased so-called estimated onomastic data – which attempts to identify individuals’ ethnic origin, religion, country of birth and other characteristics, based on their first and last names – and appended it to the records of 10 million people.The Conservative party has a history of the controversial use of such data. In 2016, Zac Goldsmith’s Conservative party campaign for London mayor was accused of trying to exploit anti-Muslim sentiment among Hindu, Sikh and Tamil voters as he competed for votes with Labour’s Sadiq Khan, which Goldsmith denied.On Tuesday, Denham faced accusations from Nicolson that the ICO was “weak when it comes to enforcement”. No political party has been served an enforcement notice for its use of data, despite the ICO identifying a number of breaches by parties in its November report. Denham insisted that enforcement had not been necessary after parties voluntary complied with her recommendations.Jim Killock, the executive director of Open Rights Group, called for more clarity on the ICO’s role regarding political data collection. Continue reading…

iHuman review – doom-laden documentary about the future of AI

Are the robots going to kills us? Film-maker Tonje Hessen Schei speaks to a range of interviewees including Elon Musk’s computer scientist in an eye-opening, anxiety-inducing filmWhat will happen when robots become smarter than humans – will they want to kill us? No, according to the computer scientist in charge of Elon Musk’s artificial intelligence research company OpenAI. His name is Ilya Sutskever and he believes that super intelligent machines won’t hate us, but they will prioritise their own survival. Think about the way we treat animals. We’re fond of them but we don’t ask their permission to build a road; it’ll be like that. His analogy is an extraordinary moment in this doom-laden documentary about the future of AI from Norwegian film-maker Tonje Hessen Schei – an eye-opening film if your anxiety levels are up to it.Another interviewee jokes that AI is being developed by a few companies and a handful of governments for three purposes – “killing, spying and brainwashing” and the film then briskly rattles through the worst-case scenarios facing human civilisation. I suspect nothing here will be a bombshell to anyone who is up to speed on surveillance society in China, autonomous weapons, bias in policing algorithms, the effects of living in online echo chambers, big data and the Cambridge Analytica scandal. But iHuman helpfully gathers all the strands together into one apocalyptic package, detailing the many ways in which technology is a risk to life as we know it. Continue reading…