Australia's cheapest EV: can it survive a week of on-street parking and one very sandy dog?

The MG ZS EV brings electric cars into the realm of financial possibility for many more families. But is there a gap between possible and practical?

The big question facing a lot of prospective electric car owners is: will it make my life easier or harder? It’s a question that I desperately want to answer. As the owner of a VW Tiguan with a dirty secret (the company lied about how bad its emissions were and misled regulators) I am more than ready to embrace the new era of zero-emission cars. But I was not convinced that any electric vehicle on the market would cope with my life – city bound, apartment dwelling, with two kids and a large, often very sandy and badly-behaved dog.

Related: Dirty lies: how the car industry hid the truth about diesel emissions

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