Big tech facilitated QAnon and the Capitol attack. It’s time to hold them accountable

Social media platforms have become information monopolies with runaway scale, an ideal place for conspiracy theories to fester

Donald Trump’s election lies and the 6 January attack on the US Capitol have highlighted how big tech has led our society down a path of conspiracies and radicalism by ignoring the mounting evidence that their products are dangerous.

But the spread of deadly misinformation on a global scale was enabled by the absence of antitrust enforcement by the federal government to rein in out-of-control monopolies such as Facebook and Google. And there is a real risk social media giants could sidestep accountability once again.

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